Slant *        6        Forum
Home Home Home
The Place to Go for Slant Six Info!
Click here to help support the Slant Six Forum upgrade!
It is currently Thu Apr 18, 2019 5:30 pm

All times are UTC-07:00




Post new topic  Reply to topic  [ 18 posts ]  Go to page 1 2 Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Break in period
PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2019 9:24 am 
Offline
1 BBL (New)

Joined: Sun Jul 29, 2018 5:29 pm
Posts: 3
Car Model*: plymouth fury
What do you all recommend for the break in period on a fresh /6.


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: Break in period
PostPosted: Sun Feb 10, 2019 4:37 am 
Offline
Board Sponsor & Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Mon Oct 21, 2002 11:08 am
Posts: 12964
Location: Blacksburg, VA
Car Model*:
Personally, I keep it under 3000 RPM for at least 500 miles, and I go on the hwy and accelerate then let off to seat the rings. Not sure it does anything, but it makes me feel better. If it is a race motor, then obviously I cannot do road breakin (which I do not like).

I assume you know about break in of a new camshaft?

Lou

_________________
"You mean you still have a Slant 6 in that thing?"


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: Break in period
PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 11:17 am 
Offline
Board Sponsor & Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 17, 2002 7:27 pm
Posts: 11853
Location: Park Forest, Illinoisy
Car Model*: 68 Valiant
My last new motor I fired, let run long enough to warm up and check for leaks, and took it out on the highway by my shop and hit it with 100 shot of nitrous in low gear. :mrgreen:

Disclaimer! Please don't try this at home.

_________________
Official Cookie and Mater Tormentor.


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: Break in period
PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 12:32 pm 
Online
TBI Slant 6
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 15, 2011 7:56 pm
Posts: 202
Location: Pauls Valley, OK
Car Model*: 1975 Dodge D100
slantzilla wrote:
My last new motor I fired, let run long enough to warm up and check for leaks, and took it out on the highway by my shop and hit it with 100 shot of nitrous in low gear. :mrgreen:

Disclaimer! Please don't try this at home.

"That boy ain't right."
:lol: :lol: :lol:

_________________
1975 Dodge D100 225 c.i., HEI, Parallel 2 bbl Motorcraft 2150, 727 auto, 9.25" 3.55:1
Image


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: Break in period
PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 6:09 pm 
Offline
Board Sponsor

Joined: Wed Oct 23, 2002 7:57 pm
Posts: 5723
Location: Waynesboro, Pa.
Car Model*: 65 Valiant 2Dr Post
Quote:
I keep it under 3000 RPM for at least 500 miles


Lou is a very, very, very patient man. Pretty sure me, Not so much!! :D :D

_________________
2 Mopars come with Spark plug tubes. One is a highly refined, world class, racing machine. The other is a 426 CI. boat anchor!
Image
Image


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: Break in period
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 3:13 am 
Offline
TBI Slant 6
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 29, 2004 7:00 am
Posts: 233
Location: Old Junee, Australia
Car Model*: 69 Valiant 225, 70 with a 265, 70 with a 318
Start, check for oil pressure, leaks etc.
Run the cam in
Drive it easy for 500 miles, vary the load and rpm.
Change oil and filter. Check valves, timing, etc.
Drive it like you stole it.

_________________
Richard (aka Fingers)
Image


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: Break in period
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 5:56 am 
Offline
Turbo Slant 6
User avatar

Joined: Mon Aug 02, 2010 7:36 am
Posts: 580
Location: Rome, GA
Car Model*: 1963 Dart 270, 1980 D150
I change the oil a lot on new engines. I change it after initial start up and cam break in, then again in a few hundred miles, then a pretty normal schedule.

_________________
Freedom is for fun.
-P. J. O'Rourke


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: Break in period
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 6:09 am 
Offline
Board Sponsor & Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Mon Oct 21, 2002 11:08 am
Posts: 12964
Location: Blacksburg, VA
Car Model*:
I usually break in the cam, then drive about 50-100 miles, then change it, then change again around 1000 miles.

Lou

_________________
"You mean you still have a Slant 6 in that thing?"


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: Break in period
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 7:35 am 
Offline
TBI Slant 6
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jul 05, 2009 9:13 pm
Posts: 145
Location: Seattle, WA
Car Model*:
What I do for any new engine or cam....

Start, quick tune, lock idle at 2200rpm for 20 minutes, change oil/filter, drive normal for 100 miles, chnge oil/filter, retorque head bolts, adjust lifters if needed, drive 400 miles normal, change oil/filter then beat the crap out of it!

Note... I never, ever use a fram oil filter when changing oil!

_________________
Always looking for rare slant speed parts and slant Hilborn stuff.
WANTED...Wilford Days Slant coffee table (yes that one).


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: Break in period
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 9:21 am 
Offline
Turbo EFI
User avatar

Joined: Mon May 12, 2008 1:11 am
Posts: 1367
Location: North Georgia
Car Model*:
JR wrote:
Note... I never, ever use a fram oil filter when changing oil!

Best advice on this list!

I crank it up, tune if necessary, and run in the cam at 2500 RPM for 20 minutes. Check for leaks. Change oil and filter. Drive sensibly for 250 miles, making sure to use compression to decelerate down hills to help the rings seat. Change oil and filter and check for leaks. Drive for another 5000 miles, then switch over to synthetic oil. Be happy for many years.

_________________
If it was easy, everybody would be doing it.
Image


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: Break in period
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 5:59 pm 
Offline
Board Sponsor

Joined: Wed Oct 23, 2002 7:57 pm
Posts: 5723
Location: Waynesboro, Pa.
Car Model*: 65 Valiant 2Dr Post
So what are we doing to seal up race motor rings? Obviously we are not running them down the road, but we still need them to seat. Honestly on any engine I have, race or otherwise, they probably have 3-4 heat cycles and probably that many hours of time on them before they get out of my garage. After they leave the garage and run down the road, I really don't give break in much of a thought. I change the oil filter as soon as I break in the cam. And then I change oil and filter at 500 miles.

_________________
2 Mopars come with Spark plug tubes. One is a highly refined, world class, racing machine. The other is a 426 CI. boat anchor!
Image
Image


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: Break in period
PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 6:16 pm 
Offline
Board Sponsor & Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 17, 2002 7:27 pm
Posts: 11853
Location: Park Forest, Illinoisy
Car Model*: 68 Valiant
Rick, when I put the Valiant back together the motor had sat for 15+ years under Mike's bench. Basically, it needed the rings broken in again. I got it running, drove on and off the trailer a couple times, and up to Tech and back. I figured I'd do a nice, easy burnout and a 1/2 thrttle pass to give it a chance.

Got in the water and the adrenalin kicked in. They gave me the GO! sign and the tach went almost instantly to 7000 in 2nd and 6000 in high. :lol:

Again, don't try this at home. :mrgreen:

_________________
Official Cookie and Mater Tormentor.


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: Break in period
PostPosted: Wed Feb 13, 2019 2:58 am 
Offline
Board Sponsor & Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Mon Oct 21, 2002 11:08 am
Posts: 12964
Location: Blacksburg, VA
Car Model*:
I am not such a believer that it is the rings you are seating in 500 miles. I think that part happens pretty fast - several heat cycles and RPM probably doesn't matter much. There are many other things that can "work in" over some time that will harden or find their happy worn place before applying high loads. Everything usually will be just fine with not much break in, but I think there will be occasional things that will survive long term if they are worn in at low load first. This is basically a feeling based on long engine use and repair, and on observing things like synchro rings healing themselves after high load damage, and then 1000 miles of street cruising. I have observed that many times with my T5.

Lou

_________________
"You mean you still have a Slant 6 in that thing?"


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: Break in period
PostPosted: Wed Feb 13, 2019 6:22 am 
Offline
Supercharged

Joined: Wed Sep 17, 2008 6:48 pm
Posts: 2557
Location: Indianapolis
Car Model*:
info from back in the work days, medium and heavy duty engine assembly

in the '70's, 100% of the engines were hot tested, all medium duty motors were ran on a test stand.
The test stand motors were idled for about 10 minutes, then ran a part throttle for another ten. No load on the engines
100% of the heavy duty motors were dyno tested. Ran at rated load and speed after complete warm up, test duration was about 45 minutes.
Test stand - Dyno cell were all manual - human connections and human monitored.

in the '80 and '90, 100% of medium and heavy duty engines were dyno tested. Total test duration was less than 3 minutes. Engines were conveyed into a cell, all connections were
made automatically, no human intervention. Engine started, went to high idle, for seconds where key parameters were verified, oil pressure, back pressure, fuel usage...
if all was good motor went to rated speed and full load then back to high idle then back to full load and speed then back to idle, three cycles. no issues the motor went on to final trim and shipping.


in the 2000's to current, for medium and heavy duty engines, a small sample of engines are actually started. Around 90% of the engines leave the engine assembly plan with out ever being actually ran. Around 10% of the engines are dyno tested on a daily basis. Dyno duration is relatively short. All functionality testing is done as part of the assembly process. There is multiple torque to turn stations in the assembly process. For example, after crankshaft and main bearing cap install, the short block goes into a test stand and the crankshaft is spun, there is a torque sensor on the coupler, from testing the parameters are known of what good and bad assemblies look like on a torque curve, so a missing crank bearing or loose main cap will be detected. And that philosophy is carried out through out the assembly process. It is build then test, build then test, so the testing is done in process.

The thought being here, today for most new motors the first time the engines starts is at the vehicle assembly plants when the vehicle is driven off the assembly line. No care is given to seating the rings or frequent initial oil changes or many of the other things we give thought to. Of course todays modern motors are assembled in very clean conditions, modern torque control, certified parts.. probably not like our garages.


Top
   
 Post subject: Re: Break in period
PostPosted: Wed Feb 13, 2019 6:59 am 
Offline
EFI Slant 6
User avatar

Joined: Sat Sep 13, 2014 8:25 am
Posts: 393
Location: Springtucky OR
Car Model*:
I've been using the 'Mototune' break in method for everything I've built in the last 10+ years with excellent results.

The Mototune web site is a bit over the top and hard on the eyes but the information is good.

--> http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm

_________________
--> Check out my FI Turbo build <--
Image


Top
   
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic  Reply to topic  [ 18 posts ]  Go to page 1 2 Next

All times are UTC-07:00


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Limited