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PostPosted: Mon Mar 10, 2008 11:09 am 
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Supercharged
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Would a circuit breaker be a better alternative to OEM stile fusible link on a 67 Dart with no extra electronics added to the car. If a breaker, what rating should I go with.

The fusible link that was used in this car is blue, #14 conductor. I don't know what its rating in amps would be. I belive the alternator is rated a 35 amps.

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 10, 2008 11:23 am 
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A fuselink and a circuit breaker behave differently — this is why fuselinks don't have straightforward amperage ratings like circuit breakers and fuses do. Take a look at this post and the links from it (and the posts above and below it in the thread), for info on replacing fuselinks with other types of circuit protection devices.

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PostPosted: Sun Mar 16, 2008 6:34 pm 
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Ron Francis Wiring catalog's "Tip #107" on page 93 recommends Maxi Fuses to replace fusible links.

I understand the difference between fast acting fusing, and slow-blow, or time delay fusing and the way a fusible link reacts to an over current. I have to think a controlled opening of a circuit with a fuse has to be a better alternative to a burning dripping wire hanging from one's fire wall.

I am in the process of repairing a heat related mess of my bulkhead connector due to the fusible link trying to do its job, and an other conductor causing melting from the past, I would rather replace a fuse.

I realise most all the connectors in this car are suffering from corrosion, and I will be swapping out the brass connectors with new ones to lessen the over heating caused by the high resistance.

The other solution to over current in this car will be not to have a bunch of after market electrical crap installed.

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67' Dart GT Convertible; the old Chrysler Corp.

82' LeBaron Convertible; the new Chrysler Corp

07' 300 C AWD; Now by Fiat, the old new Chrysler LLC



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PostPosted: Tue Sep 03, 2019 5:29 pm 
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2 BBL ''SuperSix''
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Location: Decatur, Illinois
Car Model*: 1970 Plymouth GTX
wjajr wrote:
Would a circuit breaker be a better alternative to OEM stile fusible link on a 67 Dart with no extra electronics added to the car. If a breaker, what rating should I go with.

The fusible link that was used in this car is blue, #14 conductor. I don't know what its rating in amps would be. I belive the alternator is rated a 35 amps.


Gentlemen,
When I learned electrical engineering years ago, I was told that if an alternator was suddenly disconnected from its load, like a main fuse blowing out, or fusable link failing, the end results were usually one or two of the diodes failing. Most Chrysler alternators used a three phase full wave bridge rectifier circuit. If one of the diodes, either positive or negative, fails (usually fails open circuit) the alternator's output is reduced by half, not one third. For that reason, I would stay with the fusable link arrangement. This method, albeit slow, allows any down stream fuse to open and clear the fault b4 the alternator is totally disconnected. Most fusable links are sized 2 or 3 WIRE SIZE smaller than the circuit it protecting. For this reason it is imperative that the fusable link's connection points are kept clean without any oxidation to svoid overheating the link assembly. This is just my opinion of course.
Bob Renton


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